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Posts Tagged ‘other writers’

Reading

I came across this article:

“Have You Met a Writer Who Doesn’t Read”

It’s interesting, contains a valid point, but I would have to staunchly disagree.  It does not represent absolute truth.

I have a serious problem with the superior, almost arrogant tone the blogger maintains when judging who is a writer and who should be one.  Writers are not definably created out of readers.  Writers can be created from non-readers, illiterates.

Please note, this is not to say that reading isn’t important.  Reading helps.  Reading is important. For most, reading plays a vital role in writing.  But it does not define a writer.  What a writer writes, chooses to write defines a writer.

I like reading.  However, with my life as of late, I’ve little time to do so.  It’s disappointing.  I love books, but I do not have the energy to complete the second half of A Game of Thrones.  Or, I should elaborate.  I have energy, yes, that I would much prefer to utilize elsewhere.  In certain times, dependent entirely on my mood, I will choose to write over reading.  When you add it all up, I write more than I read in a week.  As a matter of fact, I have not read a book for several weeks.  But I’ve written thousands of words.  Does that mean, then, by this blogger’s standards, I am not a writer because I did not invest nonexistent time into reading? I think not.

The concept is not universally applicable.  And another thing.  I think the blogger mistakenly categorizes reading into a singular group: books.  Books are not the only methods of reading.  Goodness, no.  In a week’s time, I do read, process enormous amounts of information.  I read Internet articles, particularly about blogging, publishing, and writing CONSTANTLY.  And really, I read articles constantly.  Practically, every time I jump on the Internet, I read at least three new articles that pop up on my subscription lists.  Does that not count as reading, as well?  It may not be a book, but would not reading about writing be just as useful as reading the work of another writer?

Maybe I’m just snubbed by the whole idea expressed on the post–how dare these children who hardly read want to become writers!  What is wrong with them for not reading more!–the sentiment that seems to be shared is that it feels wrong for non-readers to pursue a possible dream in writing.  It is not the job of writers to put down aspiring writers because they do not read as many books as they do.  Encourage them to read, yes, but do not “dog” those who do not because they are part of this “younger generation” that everyone seems to feel is a generation of unintelligent, uneducated philistines who have the over-inflated ego as everyone else does.

By the way, just about every writer has a huge ego.  Some are better at masking it than others.

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As a prospective/hopeful author, I often find myself researching various websites and publishers, deciding between traditional houses and independent publishing.  I’ve found myself leaning towards the latter and thus looking into the eBook and Print on Demand market.  Publishers I’ve considered are Amazon’s CreateSpace and Lulu.  Both have their upsides and their down.  Lulu is quite user-friendly with a lot of help and support and they love blogging about the writing world.  It’s a great indie publishing writing community, very welcoming.   One article drew my attention, It’s Never Too Soon to Become an Author.

It’s an interesting article, nothing particularly significant.  It draws examples from Anne Franke and Christopher Paolini.  I have to commend Lulu for their attempt to draw customers of all ages.  I’d always love writing and started writing this massive six book fantasy series in junior high.  Funnily enough, Christopher Paolini was my inspiration.  I’d been reading the Inheritance Cycle (trilogy, then) at the time.  Even though Chris had help from his publishing parents, I wanted to be the child prodigy that wrote bestsellers at the age of fourteen.  Well, here I am at nineteen, barely scraping at my current project.

No matter.  I am ambitious and determined.  The indie publishing market is growing and I want to be a part of it.  As much as I love Lulu’s community, I do believe I’ll turn to Amazon.  But I haven’t fully decided.  I need to finish the damn book first.

Also, here is an article from the New York Times on indie publishing, The Joys and Hazards of Self Publishing on the Web.  Also, enjoy a picture of me.

As an after thought, 15 Signs Indie Publishing is for You.

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Starting out in the deli, I have received numerous amounts of helpful pointers and counsel on how to do my job correctly, efficiently, and effectively.  However, one piece of advice sticks out among the others, given to me by a certain lady whom I really look up to.  She tells me, in essence, that everyone has their own way about doing something.  As long as the end result is the same, it does not matter how you go about doing that.  After some thinking and sweating in my new station wagon that has no air conditioning while the temperature was well past 107 degrees, I decided that the same principal can be applied to writing.

First, it must be determined what the end result is needed to be achieved.  In the deli, that can be having all the party trays finished in time for customers or cleaning the meat slicers to certain standards.  How can this compare to writing?  What would be a successful result for writers?

I must admit, this entry was also spurred after stalking some forums for the past few days.  In particular, I read along as members would treat other members with arrogance, supposedly because they were published authors.  Mind you, this was a forum for roleplaying.  I’m not a regular of the forum so I don’t know what the social circles look like.  However, when a certain member claims to be published, I would expect a certain degree of writing to come with that.  Perhaps I’m being too critical.

I digress.  Success can be measured many different ways, all dependent on both the writer and the targeted audience.  For a writer, success may mean simply being published or reaching the New York Times’ Bestseller List.  For the reader, a successful book may be one that merely entertains them or challenges their very perspective.  So, in essence, its very subjective work.

One may be critical that a certain work has choppy syntax, impeding the flow of the whatever of the unimportant pace of the nonexistent plot.  What may be intended is a voice that short, succinct and expresses taciturn or staccato thought.  Take the male gender, for example.  The Boyfriend isn’t usually fluffy with his word choice.   That’s by no means the understood norm, though.  I don’t believe in a norm, unless it concerns formulaic plots and archetypes for certain genres and audiences.  In fact, I like it when I’m surprise.

Also, I’ll be quite honest, I started this blog over a week ago, and now I am at a loss for what I was supposed to ramble on.  I meant to say something meaningful, and I would hate to leave rather abruptly, but I’ve nothing more to say.  I’ll leave this rather open-ended.  Mayhaps I’ll return to it in the future.

As an apology for my apparent laziness, here’s an article I found a while ago on the Lulu blog about eBook pricing models.  Also, I’m considering doing book reviews to give this blog more substance, because as it stands, it’s just me rambling on about uselessness and sharing the obscure article with some sundry photographs.  Book reviews should be more enjoyable than my cynicism.

The photograph above is James May from BBC’s Top Gear.  I do not own it.

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